Best Use of Social Media for the London 2012 Olympics

Archived from the 5th Annual Shorty Industry Awards

Winners

Nike Greatness

Produced by: Wieden+Kennedy Shanghai

London 2012 set the stage for the biggest Olympics in IOC history, and Nike had big ambitions: to be the most shared and talked about brand around the world. Our approach was to disrupt the Olympic landscape by challenging the conventions of greatness on the biggest sporting stage—and in doing so, inspire and enable the next generation of athletes. In China, true greatness is reserved for the chosen, elite few. And for 5,000 years it’s been a title bestowed only on those who bring pride and honor to the nation—like Olympic athletes who win gold and break records. Anything less is considered failure. The problem is that this impossible standard discourages most Chinese kids from even trying sports, because the pressure to not fail is too intense. Nike wanted to use the energy of the London 2012 Games and inspire kids to play sports by crushing the myth that greatness only comes with gold medals and perfection. To do all that, Nike launched a 17-day multimedia counterstrike on traditional greatness, with China's 700-million-user-strong social media networks as the stage. When the opening torch was lit and the Games began, the state media focused only on what China traditionally celebrated—gold medals and national heroes. To counteract the official headlines, Nike delivered a stream of powerful social media statements that celebrated the journey of all athletes: the winners; the silvers; the bronzes, and even the athletes who came in sixth. Over the course of the Games we delivered 49 counterstrikes, constantly building momentum, to help redefine greatness with every message. The first counterstrikes only saw a few hundred retweets, since our initial followers for @JustDoIt barely topped 30,000. But soon each of our counterstrikes was getting 1000+ retweets, and even topping 10,000+, swelling our community to over 86,000 followers in just a few days. The crescendo of the Olympics for China came when its most famous athlete, Liu Xiang, took the stage. As soon as the starting gun sounded, the nation watched in shock as their top star fell in the 110-meter hurdles. Nike broke the silence with a quick reaction to re-affirm Liu Xiang's greatness. Within just a few hours our message reached 125,000 retweets. (To put this in context, if this would have happened on Twitter at the time, this would have been the most retweeted post ever. It since has been topped by a post from Justin Bieber and the “4 More Years” post from Barack Obama, both of whom have considerably more followers than we did at the time.) By this point, Nike’s message about “Greatness” had became one of the hottest topics across Chinese social media, and the buzz started spilling over. It started to affect Chinese culture and become a phenomenon. The news talked about it. Sports commentators quoted it. The media wrote about it. Celebr

Finalists

NBC Olympics

Produced by: NBC Olympics

Known as the first “Social Olympics,” the 2012 London Games set the bar for how notable events are covered by media, brands, athletes and consumers alike. As the official U.S. broadcaster of the Olympics, NBC embraced the opportunity to deliver compelling stories via five social platforms, across multiple screens. With 26 sports, 17 days of competition, a five-hour time difference and 3,500+ hours of live video on nbcolympics.com, the challenge, as the official rights holder, of covering the Games on social media was unprecedented. And that challenge didn’t begin on the day of the Opening Ceremony. NBC took a hierarchical approach to its social strategy months in advance, distinguishing between pre-Games and in-Games. The foundation laid leading up to the 2012 Olympics was paramount to NBC’s overall social success, focusing on community growth, awareness-building and excitement. In-Games presented a greater challenge: balancing the distribution of simultaneous live-streams, the announcement of results, the celebration of victory, trend-monitoring, on-air integration and editorial to complement the nightly primetime broadcast. In addition to a robust editorial plan across NBC Olympics’ five social platforms and a mobile app, NBC recognized the integral role social would play around the 2012 Games beyond its own coverage, which led to partnerships with both Facebook and Twitter. The partnerships not only solidified NBC Olympics as the informer of record across social, but in boosting awareness for the two platforms throughout NBC’s broadcast, it worked to celebrate, encourage and ultimately promote the use of social media on the whole. As an extension of the brand that has broadcast every Olympics since 1996, NBC Olympics social channels -- Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr and Google+ -- effectively drove conversation, welcomed new audiences and amplified excitement. NBC Olympics was the single largest driver of social TV conversation, with 2.4 million new people joining. In all, there were more than 82 MILLION comments made about the Olympics across social media between July 27, 2012 and August 12, 2012, making it more social than the 2012 Super Bowl, Grammys, Oscars, Golden Globes and all seven games of the 2011 World Series combined. Furthermore, 36 million of those comments were related to the NBC telecasts. Between 7 p.m. and midnight for the 17 days of competition, 99 percent of social buzz was attributed to NBC’s primetime coverage. Off air during the Games, NBC Olympics saw 86 percent fan growth on Facebook, 97 percent fan growth on Twitter, and gained 69,000 followers on Instagram and 4,300 followers on Tumblr.

BP Team USA: Using Social to Win Gold

Produced by: Social@Ogilvy

At the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics, BP announced its long-term sponsorship with the USOC and Team USA, which would extend through the 2016 Summer Games. As BP continued to work diligently in the Gulf of Mexico, it remained committed to its sponsorship with Team USA and its athletes. For the London 2012 Summer Games, BP sponsored nine Olympic and Paralympic hopefuls. BP and Ogilvy created an integrated paid, owned and earned program centered on Facebook which provided fans unprecedented access to each athlete’s personal stories – from how they started in the sport to what drives them to greatness. Fueled by regularly updated social data, fans were given the opportunity to interact with their favorite athletes and communicate with other fans, creating an eco-system of content that spurred positive engagement. All aspects of Facebook were utilized to foster an emotional connection between fans and BP’s athlete ambassadors. Facebook tabs, the timeline, videos, infographics and other content created an engaging environment for fans to learn more about BP’s five Olympic and four Paralympic athlete ambassadors. BP featured content from various events, ranging from internal employee functions to the U.S. Olympic Trials. At the U.S Track & Field Trials, BP provided live updates of race results and showcased powerful, on-the-ground images. Additionally, a relationship was formed with Time and Sports Illustrated. A Time app gave fans the opportunity to send athletes “good luck” messages prior to the Olympics and Sports Illustrated provided fans with the chance to put their own pictures on its famed cover. During the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, fans were once again given access to exclusive, behind-the-scenes content. The athlete’s families kept and shared video diary entries to capture every emotional reaction while supporting their loved ones. Also, two-time Olympic medalist, Bryan Clay, who did not qualify for the 2012 Olympics, served as BP’s London correspondent. Throughout the campaign, one of the primary goals was to raise visibility of BP’s relationship with the USOC. By the end of the Games, BP had surpassed the initial awareness goal of 15%, with awareness of BP’s sponsorship reaching 23% among the campaign’s target audience. This surpassed other major USOC sponsors, including Citibank (14%), BMW (7%) and Dow Chemical (5%). Also, BP had the second largest increase of brand perception among all Olympic sponsors going from -5.9 to +2.6. On Facebook specifically, BP’s following grew to over 300,000 fans and as of July 2012 (during the Olympics), Facebook post comments were 74% positive in support of BP’s commitment to U.S. athletes. Also, according to a third-party source (AlchemySocial), BP was one of the most popular brands engaging on Facebook during the Olympics, receiving the most “likes” and “comments” of any single Olympic-related Facebook post with 93,000+ Likes, 2,000+ comments and 1,300+ shares. As BP has made a commitment to support Team USA through at least two more Olympic Games, the engaged and active fan base that was established for London will continue to grow and serve as a vehicle for others to learn more about BP’s commitment to America.

Current Entries

BP Team USA: Using Social to Win Gold

Produced by: Social@Ogilvy

At the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics, BP announced its long-term sponsorship with the USOC and Team USA, which would extend through the 2016 Summer Games. As BP continued to work diligently in the Gulf of Mexico, it remained committed to its sponsorship with Team USA and its athletes. For the London 2012 Summer Games, BP sponsored nine Olympic and Paralympic hopefuls. BP and Ogilvy created an integrated paid, owned and earned program centered on Facebook which provided fans unprecedented access to each athlete’s personal stories – from how they started in the sport to what drives them to greatness. Fueled by regularly updated social data, fans were given the opportunity to interact with their favorite athletes and communicate with other fans, creating an eco-system of content that spurred positive engagement. All aspects of Facebook were utilized to foster an emotional connection between fans and BP’s athlete ambassadors. Facebook tabs, the timeline, videos, infographics and other content created an engaging environment for fans to learn more about BP’s five Olympic and four Paralympic athlete ambassadors. BP featured content from various events, ranging from internal employee functions to the U.S. Olympic Trials. At the U.S Track & Field Trials, BP provided live updates of race results and showcased powerful, on-the-ground images. Additionally, a relationship was formed with Time and Sports Illustrated. A Time app gave fans the opportunity to send athletes “good luck” messages prior to the Olympics and Sports Illustrated provided fans with the chance to put their own pictures on its famed cover. During the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, fans were once again given access to exclusive, behind-the-scenes content. The athlete’s families kept and shared video diary entries to capture every emotional reaction while supporting their loved ones. Also, two-time Olympic medalist, Bryan Clay, who did not qualify for the 2012 Olympics, served as BP’s London correspondent. Throughout the campaign, one of the primary goals was to raise visibility of BP’s relationship with the USOC. By the end of the Games, BP had surpassed the initial awareness goal of 15%, with awareness of BP’s sponsorship reaching 23% among the campaign’s target audience. This surpassed other major USOC sponsors, including Citibank (14%), BMW (7%) and Dow Chemical (5%). Also, BP had the second largest increase of brand perception among all Olympic sponsors going from -5.9 to +2.6. On Facebook specifically, BP’s following grew to over 300,000 fans and as of July 2012 (during the Olympics), Facebook post comments were 74% positive in support of BP’s commitment to U.S. athletes. Also, according to a third-party source (AlchemySocial), BP was one of the most popular brands engaging on Facebook during the Olympics, receiving the most “likes” and “comments” of any single Olympic-related Facebook post with 93,000+ Likes, 2,000+ comments and 1,300+ shares. As BP has made a commitment to support Team USA through at least two more Olympic Games, the engaged and active fan base that was established for London will continue to grow and serve as a vehicle for others to learn more about BP’s commitment to America.

NBC Olympics

Produced by: NBC Olympics

Known as the first “Social Olympics,” the 2012 London Games set the bar for how notable events are covered by media, brands, athletes and consumers alike. As the official U.S. broadcaster of the Olympics, NBC embraced the opportunity to deliver compelling stories via five social platforms, across multiple screens. With 26 sports, 17 days of competition, a five-hour time difference and 3,500+ hours of live video on nbcolympics.com, the challenge, as the official rights holder, of covering the Games on social media was unprecedented. And that challenge didn’t begin on the day of the Opening Ceremony. NBC took a hierarchical approach to its social strategy months in advance, distinguishing between pre-Games and in-Games. The foundation laid leading up to the 2012 Olympics was paramount to NBC’s overall social success, focusing on community growth, awareness-building and excitement. In-Games presented a greater challenge: balancing the distribution of simultaneous live-streams, the announcement of results, the celebration of victory, trend-monitoring, on-air integration and editorial to complement the nightly primetime broadcast. In addition to a robust editorial plan across NBC Olympics’ five social platforms and a mobile app, NBC recognized the integral role social would play around the 2012 Games beyond its own coverage, which led to partnerships with both Facebook and Twitter. The partnerships not only solidified NBC Olympics as the informer of record across social, but in boosting awareness for the two platforms throughout NBC’s broadcast, it worked to celebrate, encourage and ultimately promote the use of social media on the whole. As an extension of the brand that has broadcast every Olympics since 1996, NBC Olympics social channels -- Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr and Google+ -- effectively drove conversation, welcomed new audiences and amplified excitement. NBC Olympics was the single largest driver of social TV conversation, with 2.4 million new people joining. In all, there were more than 82 MILLION comments made about the Olympics across social media between July 27, 2012 and August 12, 2012, making it more social than the 2012 Super Bowl, Grammys, Oscars, Golden Globes and all seven games of the 2011 World Series combined. Furthermore, 36 million of those comments were related to the NBC telecasts. Between 7 p.m. and midnight for the 17 days of competition, 99 percent of social buzz was attributed to NBC’s primetime coverage. Off air during the Games, NBC Olympics saw 86 percent fan growth on Facebook, 97 percent fan growth on Twitter, and gained 69,000 followers on Instagram and 4,300 followers on Tumblr.

Nike Greatness

Produced by: Wieden+Kennedy Shanghai

London 2012 set the stage for the biggest Olympics in IOC history, and Nike had big ambitions: to be the most shared and talked about brand around the world. Our approach was to disrupt the Olympic landscape by challenging the conventions of greatness on the biggest sporting stage—and in doing so, inspire and enable the next generation of athletes. In China, true greatness is reserved for the chosen, elite few. And for 5,000 years it’s been a title bestowed only on those who bring pride and honor to the nation—like Olympic athletes who win gold and break records. Anything less is considered failure. The problem is that this impossible standard discourages most Chinese kids from even trying sports, because the pressure to not fail is too intense. Nike wanted to use the energy of the London 2012 Games and inspire kids to play sports by crushing the myth that greatness only comes with gold medals and perfection. To do all that, Nike launched a 17-day multimedia counterstrike on traditional greatness, with China's 700-million-user-strong social media networks as the stage. When the opening torch was lit and the Games began, the state media focused only on what China traditionally celebrated—gold medals and national heroes. To counteract the official headlines, Nike delivered a stream of powerful social media statements that celebrated the journey of all athletes: the winners; the silvers; the bronzes, and even the athletes who came in sixth. Over the course of the Games we delivered 49 counterstrikes, constantly building momentum, to help redefine greatness with every message. The first counterstrikes only saw a few hundred retweets, since our initial followers for @JustDoIt barely topped 30,000. But soon each of our counterstrikes was getting 1000+ retweets, and even topping 10,000+, swelling our community to over 86,000 followers in just a few days. The crescendo of the Olympics for China came when its most famous athlete, Liu Xiang, took the stage. As soon as the starting gun sounded, the nation watched in shock as their top star fell in the 110-meter hurdles. Nike broke the silence with a quick reaction to re-affirm Liu Xiang's greatness. Within just a few hours our message reached 125,000 retweets. (To put this in context, if this would have happened on Twitter at the time, this would have been the most retweeted post ever. It since has been topped by a post from Justin Bieber and the “4 More Years” post from Barack Obama, both of whom have considerably more followers than we did at the time.) By this point, Nike’s message about “Greatness” had became one of the hottest topics across Chinese social media, and the buzz started spilling over. It started to affect Chinese culture and become a phenomenon. The news talked about it. Sports commentators quoted it. The media wrote about it. Celebr