Best Use of Social Media for News

Archived from the 5th Annual Shorty Awards

Winners

Election 2012: CNN Worldwide Won the Social Media Battle

In early 2012, CNN’s social media team began planning how the network would incorporate social media into its coverage of the 2012 election. Part of CNN’s mission was to provide its viewers and users the most engaging coverage of the 2012 election season. Through CNN’s unparalleled political reporting combined with social connectivity, the network hoped to empower more American voters in this critical election season. CNN’s Election 2012 performance proved to be stellar from television, to mobile, to social media platforms – CNN edged out its competitors and had record breaking ratings, page views and social media mentions. Throughout the election year, CNN took the top spot for all Social Media mentions for 2012 political events (including the RNC/DNC, primary & presidential debates and Election night.) (Source: Trendrr.) During the 2012 Election season, CNN continued to grow and engage its massive social media footprint, with more than 40 million Twitter followers and 11 million Facebook fans across all of CNN branded accounts by incorporating social media in the network’s coverage of Election 2012. Part of the network’s strategy was to join forces with social media giants to extend its reach across platforms during the network’s unrivaled coverage of ‘America’s Choice 2012.’ CNN & Facebook partnered to make 'America's Choice 2012' political coverage an interactive, social experience for CNN’s on-air, mobile and online audiences and Facebook’s more than 160 million U.S. users. In the partnership, Facebook and CNN teamed to take the pulse of the American electorate and amplify the voices of the social site’s users as they share their thoughts and feelings on candidates and critical issues facing the country ahead of Election Day. This partnership included the following: CNN & Facebook Launch the The “I'm Voting” App Facebook and CNN launched an interactive, engaging “I'm Voting” Facebook application. The app enabled people who use Facebook to commit to voting and endorse specific candidates and issues. Commitments to vote were displayed on people’s Facebook timeline, news feed, and real-time ticker. CNN Facebook Election Insights During Election 2012, CNN and Facebook used election insights to measure FB Buzz about the candidates by aggregating the amount of discussion surrounding each candidate and CNN will drill down on specific state-by-state analysis. On Election Day, CNN teamed up with the Empire State Building to display electoral votes atop the spire of the building. It was a first-ever use for the Empire State Building’s new custom LED technology. The social teams for both CNN and the Empire State Building asked viewers to snap a picture to post to social media platforms like Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and CNN iReport by using the hashtags #CNNElection. CNN incorporated the photos into its coverage of Election Night on CNN platforms. CNN ended 2012 as the #1 news organization with the largest social media following on Twitter and Facebook. In Jan 2013 – CNN’s two flagship Twitter accounts reached major milestones with @CNNbrk crossing the 10 million follower mark and the @CNN main news account surpassing 7 million followers. @TwitterforNews congratulated @CNN for reaching 10mm & called the network the @LadyGaga of journalism!

Finalists

Livetweeting the Los Angeles Riots in Real Time

Produced by: NBC4

What if Twitter existed in 1992? How would social media help tell the story of Rodney King and the Los Angeles Riots? Those were the questions we asked when we were brainstorming features for 20th anniversary LA Riots coverage. What we came up with was @RealTimeLARiots, a historical replay on Twitter of the Los Angeles Riots. Each tweet corresponded to the actual date and time in history, often down to the minute. http://twitter.com/RealTimeLARiotsDespite Twitter having a trivial feel at times, our team held the story to the highest standards of journalism. We spent weeks researching and documenting April 20 to May 9, 1992, down to the minute. After recreating three weeks in a spreadsheet, we started composing tweets, with each 140-character message reviewed for accuracy, quality, tastefulness, engagement potential, multimedia and timeliness. To keep the story developing inside the Twittersphere, we used the proper web syntax, including hashtags and usernames. Also, despite having the hindsight of 2012, each tweet was composed based on what we knew at that exact moment in history, letting the story unfold naturally as if it were actually 1992. To accompany the feed, and to process media (dug up daily from the NBC4 video vault) cleanly within Twitter, we paired the account with Twitpic and Twitvid: http://twitpic.com/photos/RealTimeLARiots http://www.twitvid.com/RealTimeLARiots Younger users told us that this was the first time they realized just how scary the Los Angeles Riots were, a feeling that is hard to create through traditional reporting mediums. ‏‏@leroytellez: "@NBCLA @RealTimeLARiots A great recap of such a sad event. I was 12y/o back then couldn't grasp the social impact of what was going on." For other users -- especially those who grew up in Los Angeles -- the account was a powerful way to remember such an important anniversary. @RealTimeLARiots: "@NBCLA You guys did an amazing job with this feed. So interesting and educational. Brought back many memories. Thank you." Some users actually created new Twitter accounts with "1992" as a suffix. They tweeted along with the story, as if they too were actually there. The account posted 334 tweets to 3,288 followers. We received more than 2,500 retweets and 1,000+ favorites. Thank you for your consideration.

Making Local News Interactive

Produced by: KSL TV

The KSL Interactive Team takes news stories on trending topics -- from health to politics to the economy – and lets viewers drive the content. Instead of a reporter presenting the story, viewers are part of the story. They interact with the news through Facebook and Twitter in real time. This isn’t putting social media on TV for fun, this is an effort to use social media to tell a better news story. In the era of DVR programming and online news consumption, these interactive stories make viewers want to make an appointment to watch the news live – via TV or online through the KSL Livestream. By making stories interactive, viewers participate and retain knowledge. Viewers remember what they learned because they are part of the story. KSL did six interactive stories during 2012, as well as four interactive segments during the presidential and vice-presidential debates. How it works: KSL Interactive stories are promoted through social media and TV for a few days leading up to the story. Viewers are told the topic and encouraged to tune in and share their opinion. Then, during the story, the reporter asks questions. In real time, viewers answer the questions on Facebook or Twitter. The answers are inserted throughout the story. Often, the reporter will ask a question as the news is going to a commercial break and show viewers response when the news returns. Viewers are engaged as they watch for their answers to appear and watch the story at the same time. Success: KSL keeps viewers during these stories, as is evident through sustained Nielsen and Rentrak ratings and a 42 percent average lead-in lift on Interactive story nights, according to Nielsen. On Facebook, the posts asking the questions see hundreds of comments and according to Facebook analytics reach over 33 percent of KSL’s Facebook fans in a matter of minutes. On Twitter, the #KSLLIVE hashtag is used to solicit viewer opinions. KSL switched it to #KSLPolitics for interactive stories following the presidential debates and trended locally during all four debates as we interacted with viewers during the debate and in our 10 p.m. newscast. The first story branded as a KSL Interactive in February 2012 was the Brain Test http://bit.ly/w7k8Ul. Viewers were quizzed on their memory while hearing from experts on how memory fades over time. It received a Rocky Mountain Emmy and a Utah Society of Professional Journalists award for Best Use of Social Media. The KSL Interactive stories tie into what KSL is doing elsewhere on social -- expanding news to social networks on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google Plus and beyond.

Fake Hurricane Sandy Photos: Help Us Identify #FakeSandy Pictures

Produced by: The Guardian

As Hurricane Sandy made landfall in the US, there was a significant amount of misinformation spread over social media about the storm’s impact. Anticipating the potential for misinformation during a destructive and far-reaching news event, as well its impact to those in imminent danger, the Guardian US’s Social News Editor Katie Rogers launched a hashtag, “#FakeSandy,” and issued a call-out to readers over Twitter to help identify inaccurate, outdated or doctored images and video which purport to show the effects of Hurricane Sandy. Rogers developed a useful guide to help readers identify fake photos and videos and how to make sure they’re not helping to propagate misinformation. Readers were encouraged to use the hashtag, along with a photo link to @GuardianUS, or by leaving links in the comments section. Submissions were collected and moderated using Storify and featured in the post, “Fake Hurricane Sandy Photos: Help Us Identify #FakeSandy Pictures.” As Hurricane Sandy made landfall in the US, there was a significant amount of misinformation spread over social media about the storm’s impact. The storm was a highly anticipated event that had people scrambling for news before the inevitable outages struck. With many relying on on social media and relevant hashtags to follow what was happening on the ground and in real time, doctored images and photos of the storm’s impact were uploaded to Twitter, Facebook and Instagram, and shared virally. It is an act that may seem harmless at face value, but sharing misleading photos can misinform people who are already vulnerable to danger. With social media’s growing influence on traditional news reporting, misinformation beget misinformation and led to a significant amount of uncertainty about what was happening on the ground in New York City. As Hurricane Sandy made landfall in New York City on October 29, 2012, the Guardian’s Social News Editor, Katie Rogers, recognized this potentially harmful trend and launched the “#FakeSandy” hashtag and issued a call-out to readers over Twitter to help identify inaccurate, outdated or doctored images and video which purport to show the effects of Hurricane Sandy. She searched for and curated images into Storify and shared those results with Guardian readers the social community at large. Rogers quick thinking and nimble approach to social news reporting exemplifies both a creative and effective use of a hashtag and a model example of how to use social media for news. Given the amount of information circulating during the storm, Rogers reacted quickly with an identifiably novel approach to social news to help break through the clutter of potentially harmful misinformation. She helped facilitate and enforce accurate reporting of a major news event that was modeled by other news organizations, including The Atlantic, BuzzFeed, Forbes and SNOPES and cited by CNN's Howard Kurtz. The result was both a public service and a model example of how the Guardian’s US newsroom is innovating in the area of social news reporting.

CNN Election Insights

Produced by: Mass Relevance

CNN noticed that people were incredibly outspoken with election opinions on Facebook and wanted to make sense of this unorganized, yet extremely valuable information. However, with such great levels of volume and varying degrees of content consumability, CNN needed a way to digest and filter all of the chatter. CNN partnered with Mass Relevance and Facebook to transform Facebook posts into meaningful insights for their audience. Leveraging the Mass Relevance platform, CNN was able to aggregate, filter, and visualize real-time Facebook conversations about the presidential candidates. The Facebook + CNN Insights page incorporated a number of visualizations that allowed for a high degree of user adaptation. For example, users could view the election conversation by candidate, demographic, geography, or timeframe. Using Facebook content as the source fueling the experience, CNN could display raw mentions, but also provide insight into who was doing the talking.CNN successfully tapped into real-time social conversations to not only tell the news, but to transform social content into the news itself. The site also served as a great platform for political influencers to voice their opinions. By organizing Facebook posts by number of likes, the page served as a sort of online opinion meritocracy with the most-liked posts earning the top spots on the page. The feedback system prompted huge levels of engagement and allowed users to take part in meaningful debate. The CNN/Facebook page became a great place to access information as well as add to the discussion by posting or commenting. The page also helped CNN grow their social footprint. Users had the opportunity to like CNN Politics, helping them reach almost 100,00 fans by the end of the campaign. Even more impressive, over 43,000 people recommended the page on Facebook by clicking the unobtrusive recommend button on the top of the page. The campaign drove a total of 1.4 million visits. The top 5 posts on the page garnered an average of over 2500 likes, with the top pst capturing 7,500, well over the average of 54 likes for a typical post.

Destino 2012 – Univision Election Coverage

Produced by: Univision

Throughout the crucial 2012 Election cycle, Univision threaded social media across #Destino2012 coverage. The Election Day activities alone ranked the network as one of the Big Five networks with social TV activity, regardless of language and No. 1 Spanish-language news source on social with 1.4 million of Social TV activity. According to SocialGuide, the Univision hashtag, #Destino2012, ranked as the No. 4 top TV hashtag on Election Day and Univision handles (@uninoticias, @unipolitica and @univision) were among the top 20 TV program accounts. Additionally, Univision News co-anchor Jorge Ramos' Twitter account ranked as the No. 2 top TV star account.Viewers were an integral part of Univision’s Election coverage through social media. Kicking off with dedicated social properties, users had real-time access through Twitter via @uninoticias, @unipolitica, @uninewspolitics and via #Destino2012 as well as topical hashtags. Through Univision Facebook pages, voters had access to live updates, debates, analysis and the latest coverage. Additionally, Univision was the exclusive Spanish-language news source for the YouTube Elections Hub. Leading up to Election Day and in direct partnership with Facebook, Univision identified an opportunity to host one-of-a-kind “Meet the Candidate” events with President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney. Audience had one-of-a-kind direct access to the candidates as their questions submitted via Facebook were asked on the broadcast to both Obama and Romney. These one-on-ones events were exclusively streamed via Facebook in English, in Spanish on UnivisionNoticias.com and later televised on the Univision Network. Univision created a dedicated section in Facebook to house all elements of the events. Univision continued to leverage social media full force throughout the Debates via the dedicated YouTube Politics Hub, in real-time on Twitter and on Facebook. On the broadcast, real-time Tweets from viewers were integrated during the post-debate analysis show, in addition to LIVE Tweeting by the political analysts. Google+ Hangouts were also held for pre and post debate analysis to capture real-time reactions from the audience. Each debate and Google+ Hangout was streamed LIVE on the politics hub. Election Day - The social media pulse featured a dedicated social media position that integrated viewers’ opinions and updates as well as provided social updates and analysis on traffic and stats. Once President Obama’s reelection was announced, Univision asked viewers to participate in an on-air LIVE Twitter poll, asking which issue POTUS should first tackle in office using specified hashtags #primeroinmigracion (immigration) or #primeroeconomia (economy). Up-to-the-minute data and real-time updates based on viewers’ social responses to key election night questions and a social map highlighting users’ Twitter comments from different states were also broadcast on-air. Voters at the Election Day polling locations were also encouraged to submit photos and videos via the “Tu Camara” feature on the Noticias app which were then featured on our coverage.

Current Entries

Fox News Election Night 2012

Produced by: Fox News Digital

On election night 2012 Fox News combined live video streaming, live data, a hosted web show, social media chat, and social media reporting into one unified experience: the Fox News Election Command Center. The Command Center featured a live interactive web show - FoxNews.com Live - co-anchored by Jonathan Hunt and Harris Faulkner. The program also featured Happening Now’s Jenna Lee, who teamed-up with Twitter online and on-air “to bring viewers the latest on Twitter and other data analytics." The Command Center also featured video feeds from locations around the country, and real-time elections data and race calls down to the state and county level. The social chat allowed users to login via their Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn or Google accounts to discuss the election and provide their own reactions as winners were called. Social reporting was highlighted within a coordinated stream of Twitter updates provided by Fox News reporters, personalities and producers.FoxNews.com’s 2012 Election Command Center set audience records and was the most comprehensive and coordinated realtime experience across live TV and web on election night, integrating social media buzz, live video, elections data, live conversations and Twitter-powered reporting all in one experience. Social Chat volume: >500K users at peak (source: Livefyre) Unique Visitors: >17 Million Page Views: > 179 Million Live Streams: > 3 Million (source: Omniture SiteCatalyst)

NBC News 2012 Election Night

Produced by: NBC News Digital

NBC News paired its top-rated 2012 Election Night broadcast with in-depth coverage across the social web and on mobile apps to give users a first of its kind election experience. Twitter widgets, Storify, social TV app Zeebox, Xbox Live, Instagram's API and an on-air mention of a "rogue tweet" were among the social media tools that enhanced NBC's 2012 Election Night coverage.NBC News paired its top-rated 2012 Election Night broadcast with in-depth coverage across the social web and on mobile apps to give users a first of its kind election experience. NBC’s broadcast coverage consistently topped the social TV charts throughout the political cycle and Election Day was no different. According to Trendrr, the cross-platform strategy on Nov. 6 resulted in a social activity metric of 1.45 million interactions. A key to the strategy was how NBC News built a brand consistent experience on TV, online and across several social media platforms. On television, which garnered over 12 million viewers, after a user prematurely sent a Tweet calling the Senate race in Massachusetts, NBC’s Brian Williams quickly corrected the “rogue tweet” on air. While on the homepage of NBCNews.com, users found a comprehensive coverage along with a stream of real-time social reporting from NBC News’ campaign embeds and political team. A live stream of the six-hour broadcast was shown with detailed election data, insight and analysis. NBCNews.com also featured a live blog created with Storify to showcase reactions shared on social media. A second Storify was made after Obama's re-election. NBC News took advantage of the shift to mobile this election season with the NBC Politics and Zeebox apps. A live stream of the 2012 Election Night broadcast was shown on the NBC Politics app along with analysis, video and social reporting. A fully optimized social experience was available with the social TV app Zeebox. Zeebox users followed along with Tweets from their friends, stars, other viewers and NBC News’ political reporters. In addition, they shared behind the scenes views of NBC News’ coverage at Democracy Plaza to their social networks. Both apps are available for free on the iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad. Zeebox is available for Android as well. Xbox Live Gold members were able to watch NBC News’ broadcast via the NBC News app for Xbox. This experience was enhanced with an interactive election-themed questionnaire. On the more experimental side, ElectionGrams.com offered a one of a kind look at the country’s most social election. Voters shared their election photos to Instagram, which were then curated, collected and displayed across a map based on the photo’s geolocation. ElectionGrams.com was updated around the clock on Election Day. NBC News also provided real-time Election Night coverage on Google+, Tumblr and Pinterest.

CNN Election Insights

Produced by: Mass Relevance

CNN noticed that people were incredibly outspoken with election opinions on Facebook and wanted to make sense of this unorganized, yet extremely valuable information. However, with such great levels of volume and varying degrees of content consumability, CNN needed a way to digest and filter all of the chatter. CNN partnered with Mass Relevance and Facebook to transform Facebook posts into meaningful insights for their audience. Leveraging the Mass Relevance platform, CNN was able to aggregate, filter, and visualize real-time Facebook conversations about the presidential candidates. The Facebook + CNN Insights page incorporated a number of visualizations that allowed for a high degree of user adaptation. For example, users could view the election conversation by candidate, demographic, geography, or timeframe. Using Facebook content as the source fueling the experience, CNN could display raw mentions, but also provide insight into who was doing the talking.CNN successfully tapped into real-time social conversations to not only tell the news, but to transform social content into the news itself. The site also served as a great platform for political influencers to voice their opinions. By organizing Facebook posts by number of likes, the page served as a sort of online opinion meritocracy with the most-liked posts earning the top spots on the page. The feedback system prompted huge levels of engagement and allowed users to take part in meaningful debate. The CNN/Facebook page became a great place to access information as well as add to the discussion by posting or commenting. The page also helped CNN grow their social footprint. Users had the opportunity to like CNN Politics, helping them reach almost 100,00 fans by the end of the campaign. Even more impressive, over 43,000 people recommended the page on Facebook by clicking the unobtrusive recommend button on the top of the page. The campaign drove a total of 1.4 million visits. The top 5 posts on the page garnered an average of over 2500 likes, with the top pst capturing 7,500, well over the average of 54 likes for a typical post.

Election 2012: CNN Worldwide Won the Social Media Battle

In early 2012, CNN’s social media team began planning how the network would incorporate social media into its coverage of the 2012 election. Part of CNN’s mission was to provide its viewers and users the most engaging coverage of the 2012 election season. Through CNN’s unparalleled political reporting combined with social connectivity, the network hoped to empower more American voters in this critical election season. CNN’s Election 2012 performance proved to be stellar from television, to mobile, to social media platforms – CNN edged out its competitors and had record breaking ratings, page views and social media mentions. Throughout the election year, CNN took the top spot for all Social Media mentions for 2012 political events (including the RNC/DNC, primary & presidential debates and Election night.) (Source: Trendrr.) During the 2012 Election season, CNN continued to grow and engage its massive social media footprint, with more than 40 million Twitter followers and 11 million Facebook fans across all of CNN branded accounts by incorporating social media in the network’s coverage of Election 2012. Part of the network’s strategy was to join forces with social media giants to extend its reach across platforms during the network’s unrivaled coverage of ‘America’s Choice 2012.’ CNN & Facebook partnered to make 'America's Choice 2012' political coverage an interactive, social experience for CNN’s on-air, mobile and online audiences and Facebook’s more than 160 million U.S. users. In the partnership, Facebook and CNN teamed to take the pulse of the American electorate and amplify the voices of the social site’s users as they share their thoughts and feelings on candidates and critical issues facing the country ahead of Election Day. This partnership included the following: CNN & Facebook Launch the The “I'm Voting” App Facebook and CNN launched an interactive, engaging “I'm Voting” Facebook application. The app enabled people who use Facebook to commit to voting and endorse specific candidates and issues. Commitments to vote were displayed on people’s Facebook timeline, news feed, and real-time ticker. CNN Facebook Election Insights During Election 2012, CNN and Facebook used election insights to measure FB Buzz about the candidates by aggregating the amount of discussion surrounding each candidate and CNN will drill down on specific state-by-state analysis. On Election Day, CNN teamed up with the Empire State Building to display electoral votes atop the spire of the building. It was a first-ever use for the Empire State Building’s new custom LED technology. The social teams for both CNN and the Empire State Building asked viewers to snap a picture to post to social media platforms like Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and CNN iReport by using the hashtags #CNNElection. CNN incorporated the photos into its coverage of Election Night on CNN platforms. CNN ended 2012 as the #1 news organization with the largest social media following on Twitter and Facebook. In Jan 2013 – CNN’s two flagship Twitter accounts reached major milestones with @CNNbrk crossing the 10 million follower mark and the @CNN main news account surpassing 7 million followers. @TwitterforNews congratulated @CNN for reaching 10mm & called the network the @LadyGaga of journalism!

Katie Couric's Election Night Live Blog

Produced by: Katie Couric Election Night Live Blog and Live Tweeting

ABC's Katie Couric joined ABC News' Election Night coverage from Times Square Studios where she was live tweeting and blogging election results for the network throughout the evening. Katie also worked out of the studio to break down the results of the election across various social platforms. ABC News' Election coverage was unlike any other because of the strong focus on social media. Katie focused on the trending topics and breaking hashtags that developed throughout the night, synthesizing the key moments that resonated most with voters. Katie Couric's live blog also offered viewers more insight into Election night and provided real-time social updates to viewers.Katie Couric's social media coverage on Election Night 2012 deserves to win because it was the first time ABC News had focused an enormous part of the network broadcast on social media and reaction from some of the strongest social voice across the country. As the full time host of "Katie," Katie Couric was in a new role as the Social Media correspondent for ABC News and did an excellent job making social reaction more relatable to viewers. Katie's live blog incorporated a unique mix of images and thoughtful tweets all night long, providing an honest, real-time depiction of the Election as it unfolded. Katie Couric's Election Night coverage offered ABC viewers the best of broadcast television and the web, combining in-depth analysis and commentary from all social platforms. Katie captured the best moments and images of Election Night too, sourcing photos, videos and commentary from voters nationwide. Video of Election Night 2012 Coverage: http://abcn.ws/Ui3QUW

Making Local News Interactive

Produced by: KSL TV

The KSL Interactive Team takes news stories on trending topics -- from health to politics to the economy – and lets viewers drive the content. Instead of a reporter presenting the story, viewers are part of the story. They interact with the news through Facebook and Twitter in real time. This isn’t putting social media on TV for fun, this is an effort to use social media to tell a better news story. In the era of DVR programming and online news consumption, these interactive stories make viewers want to make an appointment to watch the news live – via TV or online through the KSL Livestream. By making stories interactive, viewers participate and retain knowledge. Viewers remember what they learned because they are part of the story. KSL did six interactive stories during 2012, as well as four interactive segments during the presidential and vice-presidential debates. How it works: KSL Interactive stories are promoted through social media and TV for a few days leading up to the story. Viewers are told the topic and encouraged to tune in and share their opinion. Then, during the story, the reporter asks questions. In real time, viewers answer the questions on Facebook or Twitter. The answers are inserted throughout the story. Often, the reporter will ask a question as the news is going to a commercial break and show viewers response when the news returns. Viewers are engaged as they watch for their answers to appear and watch the story at the same time. Success: KSL keeps viewers during these stories, as is evident through sustained Nielsen and Rentrak ratings and a 42 percent average lead-in lift on Interactive story nights, according to Nielsen. On Facebook, the posts asking the questions see hundreds of comments and according to Facebook analytics reach over 33 percent of KSL’s Facebook fans in a matter of minutes. On Twitter, the #KSLLIVE hashtag is used to solicit viewer opinions. KSL switched it to #KSLPolitics for interactive stories following the presidential debates and trended locally during all four debates as we interacted with viewers during the debate and in our 10 p.m. newscast. The first story branded as a KSL Interactive in February 2012 was the Brain Test http://bit.ly/w7k8Ul. Viewers were quizzed on their memory while hearing from experts on how memory fades over time. It received a Rocky Mountain Emmy and a Utah Society of Professional Journalists award for Best Use of Social Media. The KSL Interactive stories tie into what KSL is doing elsewhere on social -- expanding news to social networks on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google Plus and beyond.

Fake Hurricane Sandy Photos: Help Us Identify #FakeSandy Pictures

Produced by: The Guardian

As Hurricane Sandy made landfall in the US, there was a significant amount of misinformation spread over social media about the storm’s impact. Anticipating the potential for misinformation during a destructive and far-reaching news event, as well its impact to those in imminent danger, the Guardian US’s Social News Editor Katie Rogers launched a hashtag, “#FakeSandy,” and issued a call-out to readers over Twitter to help identify inaccurate, outdated or doctored images and video which purport to show the effects of Hurricane Sandy. Rogers developed a useful guide to help readers identify fake photos and videos and how to make sure they’re not helping to propagate misinformation. Readers were encouraged to use the hashtag, along with a photo link to @GuardianUS, or by leaving links in the comments section. Submissions were collected and moderated using Storify and featured in the post, “Fake Hurricane Sandy Photos: Help Us Identify #FakeSandy Pictures.” As Hurricane Sandy made landfall in the US, there was a significant amount of misinformation spread over social media about the storm’s impact. The storm was a highly anticipated event that had people scrambling for news before the inevitable outages struck. With many relying on on social media and relevant hashtags to follow what was happening on the ground and in real time, doctored images and photos of the storm’s impact were uploaded to Twitter, Facebook and Instagram, and shared virally. It is an act that may seem harmless at face value, but sharing misleading photos can misinform people who are already vulnerable to danger. With social media’s growing influence on traditional news reporting, misinformation beget misinformation and led to a significant amount of uncertainty about what was happening on the ground in New York City. As Hurricane Sandy made landfall in New York City on October 29, 2012, the Guardian’s Social News Editor, Katie Rogers, recognized this potentially harmful trend and launched the “#FakeSandy” hashtag and issued a call-out to readers over Twitter to help identify inaccurate, outdated or doctored images and video which purport to show the effects of Hurricane Sandy. She searched for and curated images into Storify and shared those results with Guardian readers the social community at large. Rogers quick thinking and nimble approach to social news reporting exemplifies both a creative and effective use of a hashtag and a model example of how to use social media for news. Given the amount of information circulating during the storm, Rogers reacted quickly with an identifiably novel approach to social news to help break through the clutter of potentially harmful misinformation. She helped facilitate and enforce accurate reporting of a major news event that was modeled by other news organizations, including The Atlantic, BuzzFeed, Forbes and SNOPES and cited by CNN's Howard Kurtz. The result was both a public service and a model example of how the Guardian’s US newsroom is innovating in the area of social news reporting.

Livetweeting the Los Angeles Riots in Real Time

Produced by: NBC4

What if Twitter existed in 1992? How would social media help tell the story of Rodney King and the Los Angeles Riots? Those were the questions we asked when we were brainstorming features for 20th anniversary LA Riots coverage. What we came up with was @RealTimeLARiots, a historical replay on Twitter of the Los Angeles Riots. Each tweet corresponded to the actual date and time in history, often down to the minute. http://twitter.com/RealTimeLARiotsDespite Twitter having a trivial feel at times, our team held the story to the highest standards of journalism. We spent weeks researching and documenting April 20 to May 9, 1992, down to the minute. After recreating three weeks in a spreadsheet, we started composing tweets, with each 140-character message reviewed for accuracy, quality, tastefulness, engagement potential, multimedia and timeliness. To keep the story developing inside the Twittersphere, we used the proper web syntax, including hashtags and usernames. Also, despite having the hindsight of 2012, each tweet was composed based on what we knew at that exact moment in history, letting the story unfold naturally as if it were actually 1992. To accompany the feed, and to process media (dug up daily from the NBC4 video vault) cleanly within Twitter, we paired the account with Twitpic and Twitvid: http://twitpic.com/photos/RealTimeLARiots http://www.twitvid.com/RealTimeLARiots Younger users told us that this was the first time they realized just how scary the Los Angeles Riots were, a feeling that is hard to create through traditional reporting mediums. ‏‏@leroytellez: "@NBCLA @RealTimeLARiots A great recap of such a sad event. I was 12y/o back then couldn't grasp the social impact of what was going on." For other users -- especially those who grew up in Los Angeles -- the account was a powerful way to remember such an important anniversary. @RealTimeLARiots: "@NBCLA You guys did an amazing job with this feed. So interesting and educational. Brought back many memories. Thank you." Some users actually created new Twitter accounts with "1992" as a suffix. They tweeted along with the story, as if they too were actually there. The account posted 334 tweets to 3,288 followers. We received more than 2,500 retweets and 1,000+ favorites. Thank you for your consideration.

Destino 2012 – Univision Election Coverage

Produced by: Univision

Throughout the crucial 2012 Election cycle, Univision threaded social media across #Destino2012 coverage. The Election Day activities alone ranked the network as one of the Big Five networks with social TV activity, regardless of language and No. 1 Spanish-language news source on social with 1.4 million of Social TV activity. According to SocialGuide, the Univision hashtag, #Destino2012, ranked as the No. 4 top TV hashtag on Election Day and Univision handles (@uninoticias, @unipolitica and @univision) were among the top 20 TV program accounts. Additionally, Univision News co-anchor Jorge Ramos' Twitter account ranked as the No. 2 top TV star account.Viewers were an integral part of Univision’s Election coverage through social media. Kicking off with dedicated social properties, users had real-time access through Twitter via @uninoticias, @unipolitica, @uninewspolitics and via #Destino2012 as well as topical hashtags. Through Univision Facebook pages, voters had access to live updates, debates, analysis and the latest coverage. Additionally, Univision was the exclusive Spanish-language news source for the YouTube Elections Hub. Leading up to Election Day and in direct partnership with Facebook, Univision identified an opportunity to host one-of-a-kind “Meet the Candidate” events with President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney. Audience had one-of-a-kind direct access to the candidates as their questions submitted via Facebook were asked on the broadcast to both Obama and Romney. These one-on-ones events were exclusively streamed via Facebook in English, in Spanish on UnivisionNoticias.com and later televised on the Univision Network. Univision created a dedicated section in Facebook to house all elements of the events. Univision continued to leverage social media full force throughout the Debates via the dedicated YouTube Politics Hub, in real-time on Twitter and on Facebook. On the broadcast, real-time Tweets from viewers were integrated during the post-debate analysis show, in addition to LIVE Tweeting by the political analysts. Google+ Hangouts were also held for pre and post debate analysis to capture real-time reactions from the audience. Each debate and Google+ Hangout was streamed LIVE on the politics hub. Election Day - The social media pulse featured a dedicated social media position that integrated viewers’ opinions and updates as well as provided social updates and analysis on traffic and stats. Once President Obama’s reelection was announced, Univision asked viewers to participate in an on-air LIVE Twitter poll, asking which issue POTUS should first tackle in office using specified hashtags #primeroinmigracion (immigration) or #primeroeconomia (economy). Up-to-the-minute data and real-time updates based on viewers’ social responses to key election night questions and a social map highlighting users’ Twitter comments from different states were also broadcast on-air. Voters at the Election Day polling locations were also encouraged to submit photos and videos via the “Tu Camara” feature on the Noticias app which were then featured on our coverage.